Visual & Media Arts

Painting of an angel
Female student drawing a portrait in charcoal

Fine Arts

The Fine Arts Program features a studio-based curriculum, with hands-on studio assignments supplemented by a broad introduction to art history, theory, criticism, and aesthetics. Students may choose to study across a variety of studio arts disciplines, and display their work in the School’s Gallery Space.

All Fine Arts faculty members are practicing artists who instruct in their own areas of expertise as well as create their own work throughout the school year. Practicing their art while teaching it, faculty members cultivate a community of creation within the Fine Arts studios.

Male actor in front a green screen being filmed
Male student adjusting the lighting on a film set

Filmmaking

The LIHSA Filmmaking program offers a rich and challenging environment for students who are keen to develop their storytelling skills to the highest level and have the passion to produce and develop new and exciting content.

The Filmmaking program prepares students in all aspects of filmmaking, from the development of film craft skills, directing, producing and writing short and long form content for film and television. At LIHSA you have the opportunity to work with actors, composers, directors, dancers and musicians, as well as your peers from production, including scenic artists and technicians. Everything you need to make great work for the screen is right here. The program has critical thinking and film and television literacy at its core, with workshops and seminars designed to enhance your ability to appreciate what has gone before as you construct the stories of the future.

Female student drawing using a digital tablet on the computer
Female student editing a photo on the computer

Digital Media

Digital Media students at LIHSA use Web-based tools and materials as the primary means of communication and expression. In addition to an understanding of current workplace practice, this career pathway requires the development of knowledge and skills in both visual art concepts as well as new and emerging digital processes by which individuals are able to create and communicate complex concepts in a broad range of occupations and professions.

LIHSA’s Digital Media program provides a rigorous and intellectually-challenging training in the tools, applications and possibilities of the digital environment from the preparation of multimedia content to its effective display and dissemination. Our students develop a broad understanding of multimedia and Internet-based technologies in order to develop expertise in creating the type of digital content that is widely in demand.

My time at LIHSA was among the most challenging I’ve experiences and one of the most meaningful things I’ve ever accomplished.

Alumna

Program Requirements

All students accepted in the Design, Visual, and Media Arts program are required to take 3.0 core credits over the course of 2 years. Students in all three program strands will complete an additional .5 credits in Career and Financial Management coursework, a requirement of a CTE program. Beyond the required core, students select to take 4.5 additional credits in Fine Art, Digital Media, or Film, with different semester offerings each year.

Photoshop file of someone turning into flames

Digital Imaging

This course introduces digital art image making, editing and design techniques as a foundation upon which an effective visual language is built. Beginning with an investigation of the elements and principles of design, students will discover a broad range of visual ideas, concepts and techniques to use in creating images. Expressing, evaluating and communicating ideas with visual images is a primary focus of this course. During the semester, students will use imaging and design software consistent with the visual professions as a beginning step towards professional-standard computer proficiency.

.5 Credits
Fall Semester
Drawing of a pair of scissors next to dice with letters on them

Objects and Visual Meaning

Students will begin the semester by looking into the idea of meaning in everyday objects; building understandings and analyses of the ways in which meanings are assigned and associated. This will include an exploration of both analog and digital platforms and the expectations assumed or produced by each. Through these modes of inquiry, the class will focus on the how and why of making things.

.25 Credits
Fall Semester
Stage control area

Careers in the Arts

Students in this course will engage in an exploration of options available to artists after high school, matching industry requirements with pathways, including, college admissions and cost associated with it. Students will complete portfolios, engage in mock interviewing and develop resume related material. Students will also research related trends in the creative arts sector, types of jobs available and professional organizations affiliated with different sectors. Traits that are valuable for artists to possess will explored and students will learn about advocacy and networking in the professional arts world.

.125 Credits
Fall Semester
We Care sticker on a smashed piece of glass

Activism and Art-Making

This class explores the relationship between art and activism. Through case studies, slides, videos, readings and discussions, students will situate art in a historical and political context. Emphasis will be on these recurrent issues: the relationship between aesthetics and politics, conceptions of community and the public, and the practical aims of art, both intended and actual. Students will then move on to question how this might inform their own art practice. A major component of the course will be a project that students plan and execute during the semester. Choice of practice and medium will be open, but possibilities might include work that is performative, visual, or conceptual, employing photography and/or digital media, text, film, painting, or sculpture.

.5 Credits
Spring semester
A mixed media art piece of a woman and the moon

Digital Mixed-Media Lab

This class is a learning laboratory for digital art making processes from brainstorming through digital output. Students are encouraged to mix media, taking clues from a rich tradition of avant-garde experiments and current trends in digital art. All projects incorporate digital tools in some stage of their process, though the final format may integrate traditional techniques and materials. The class establishes a collaborative learning environment, wherein all participants will take turns sharing their expertise and discoveries in a laboratory of emerging technologies.

.25 Credits
Spring semester
Someone signing a contract

Artist Management

This course explores the role and importance of an artist manager, what they do, and how they impact the career of the artist and their brand. The course begins with the basics: why an artist needs a manager, the keys to finding the right partner, and a typical management contract. From there, students will cover the details of planning an artist’s career, money management and what to do when things go wrong.

.125 Credits
Spring semester
Outside of a large museum with taxis outside

Art and Institutions

In this course students will consider the formation of museums, non-profit and artist-run alternative space and commercial galleries. Students will examine different typologies of institutions—their structure, spaces, and performativity. Coursework will include video and film screenings, the study of artist writings, cultural criticism, live work, and class visits to cultural organizations in New York City and across Long Island.

.5 Credits
Fall Semester
Gallery wall of art pieces from the same artist

Curating Displays of Visual Works

The challenge of contemporary public curating is responding to the shifts in urban space and usage, to new technologies, and to new forms of social and interventionist artistic practice. This course will provide an overview of curatorial models for visual and media art, ranging from approaches to online exhibitions to models for presenting digital art in indoor spaces such as museums and galleries, at festivals or in outdoor spaces. Students will engage with challenges of and best practices for the presentation of digital art in various contexts, audience engagement, organizational structures, as well as exhibition documentation.

.25 Credits
Fall Semester
Close up of a graph graphic on a computer

Arts Entrepreneurship

Introduction to Arts Entrepreneurship is a survey of a business strategies, including money management, investing, insurance, taxes and all the other details behind a successful career in the arts. This course also emphasizes the importance of entrepreneurial thinking, engages students with the fundamentals of the arts “business”, and explores ways to influence and shape the industry’s future. The course will explore the inner workings of the arts industry, using creative problem-solving exercises, discussion questions, collaborative projects, case studies, and hands-on activities. Students will have firsthand experience with guest experts in the fields of promotion, management, and artist representatives, and thus begin creating their own networks and a path to their future activities in the arts.

.125 Credits
Fall Semester
People looking at art in a gallery

The Exhibition

Drawing on their work from the Curating Displays of Visual Works class, students will create one or more curatorial platforms in the public domain. This will require the identification of a site with related research on its historical, socio-political, and environmental context; researching the various stakeholders; writing concept statements and invitations or projects briefs for artists; a budget and communication plan; and a public presentation for feedback. This is an intensive course with substantial expectations of work outside class time. There will be guest speakers, site visits, outside research and group meetings.

.5 Credits
Spring semester
Drawing of the New York skyline at night

New York City & Surrounds in Media

The explosive growth and transformation of the modern city has inspired its frequent representation in photography, cinema, television and other media, influencing how we view and understand modern urban life. This course examines the different facets of the city over time, including industrialization and development, suburbanization, race, poverty and even dreams of future cities as they are seen through a variety of modern media.

.25 Credits
Spring semester
Student holding a camera to her face standing in front of a mural

Creative Promotion in the Arts

This class offers a comprehensive study of media options available for the promotion of artists, products, and services. It includes a brief discussion of marketing plans, followed by a detailed look at both old and new media. Concepts such as integrated marketing communication are melded with creative tools for branding. Students will analyze an existing promotion plan, as well as create one of their own for a new product. Particular attention is given to the use of the internet for communication and the location and retrieval of business-related data.

.125 Credits
Fall Semester
Lightbulbs with the filaments selling out words such as digital marketing

Creative Promotion in the Arts

This class offers a comprehensive study of media options available for the promotion of artists, products, and services. It includes a brief discussion of marketing plans, followed by a detailed look at both old and new media. Concepts such as integrated marketing communication are melded with creative tools for branding. Students will analyze an existing promotion plan, as well as create one of their own for a new product. Particular attention is given to the use of the internet for communication and the location and retrieval of business-related data.

.125 Credits
Spring semester
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Alumni Success

Making an Impact

Frank Porcu's sculpture of Abraham Lincoln
Artist Andy Friedman
He is renowned for his ability to illuminate the anatomy of the human form. In addition to his studio work, which includes private sculpture and drawing commissions, including celebrities such as Tony Bennett, he is universally lauded for the passion and imagination that goes into his distinct lecturing style and the drawings he creates in the process.

About Frank Porcu, class of ’90

As a sculptor, painter, educator, writer, and lecturer, Frank Porcu has spent over two decades studying and mastering the logistical function and structure of the human body, coupled with Florentine Neo-Platonism.

As a student of the Long Island High School for the Arts, I was given the insight, guidance, and freedom to explore the extent of my artistic interests, and instill an early artistic confidence that prepared me for the vigorous spiritual, academic, and career challenges of art school and beyond.

Andy Friedman, Class of ’93

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